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BOXXLE! Better Box Wine

Boxxle box wine

Good looking, easy-to-use, extends the freshness and life of box wine–that’s Boxxle.

Box wine, or wine in a box, has been around since 1965 when Australian winemaker Thomas Angove invented the unique wine packaging. His original box wine was a bit cumbersome, as consumers had to cut the corner off the bladder, pour the wine and then reseal it with a special peg. And Angove wasn’t the first to come up with the concept of the bag-in-box (BiB). It was developed a decade before by William R. Scholle, a U.S. inventor who came up with the bag-in-box design for the safe transport and dispensing of battery acid. No wonder box wine suffered somewhat of an image problem in those early years!

The attitude toward box wine made a shift and the stigma was lifted when California’s Black Box Wines came on the scene in 2003. They were the first U.S. vintner to offer super-premium, appellation specific, vintage dated wines in a box. And their sleek black boxes were pretty cool, too.

red wine

Air deteriorates wine. Boxxle keeps air out.

So what are the advantages of box wine? It’s lightweight, portable and unbreakable. Plus, no corkscrew is needed and light and air can’t get in, meaning it stays fresher longer. Box wine is also eco-friendly since it takes less energy to produce and transport than traditional wine in a bottle.

Now there’s Boxxle, a 3-liter premium wine box dispenser for use at home, in bars or restaurants. The stainless steel dispenser with push button serving is designed to rest on a countertop, bar or table. My husband and I tested the Boxxle at home, and after few rough starts, we finally got it to work. The main problem was that the directions were printed on the outside of the box, which ended up in our recycling. I emailed the Atlanta based company, which said they now include printed directions in each box (you can also watch a video tutorial on their website).

Boxxle box wine device

Boxxle makes pouring box wine a snap.

To use the Boxxle, remove the bladder of box wine from its cardboard box and place it into the stainless steel dispenser. Boxxle raises the wine up, so the spigot is above the glass, and automatically compresses the bag. The wine purportedly stays fresh for up to six weeks.

Our best “test” of the Boxxle included taking it to a Fourth of July gathering. Not only did it look great on the outdoor bar, it was easy for guests to use. You can access the contents of the entire bag without having to tip or drag the container to the edge of the table or countertop, and the push button serving is wine glass height. Plus, no more squeezing out that last glass of wine from the bladder.

My biggest complaint is it’s so attractive and simple to operate, it might make round-the-clock wine tasting a little too easy!—by Sue Frause, RFT Contributor  

 

 

The particulars:

Price $100

High Grade ABS Plastic

Stainless Steel

Long Life Lifting Mechanism

4.4 lbs. | 12.4”H x 8.5”W x 8.5”L

www.boxxle.com



Sue Frause

Sue Frause is a freelance writer and photographer whose words and images appear in print and online. She started her journalistic career in 1988 as a newspaper columnist and these days focuses on travel, food, entertainment and humor. Sue is the author of three blogs: Closet Canuck, Married to Martha and Eat|Play|Sleep.Although her adventures have taken her to the seven continents, Sue’s favorite place on the planet is the Pacific Northwest. She and her husband “Farmer Bob” live on Whidbey Island, WA, where she hosts the popular Kitsch ‘n Bitch — a live theater series featuring chefs, cuisine, cocktails, and conversation.