Search
Tolovana Resort – June 15 to July 15 #1
Vancouver, WA – June 2017

Farro Risotto with Prosciutto, Parmesan and Brussels Sprouts Recipe

Farro Risotto with Prosciutto Real Food Traveler Editor’s Note: I first experienced Farro, a rustic, chewy grain usually served as a side dish, at Celilo, one of my favorite restaurants in Hood River, Oregon. Farro has a nutty flavor and satisfying chewiness that fills you up. It’s a healthful and delicious alternative to white rice or other more processed grains. Try this delicious recipe for risotto with prosciutto, parmesan and Brussels sprouts (all favorite ingredients) for your holiday table. It’ll be both healthy and delicious. — BH

Recipe and opening comments courtesy Serena Wolf www.domesticate-me.com and Sidechef www.sidechef.com

For those of you who aren’t familiar with farro, it’s an unhybridized (pure form) of wheat that’s one of the oldest (if not THE oldest) cultivated grain in the world. It’s high in fiber and rich in cyanogenic glucosides, that stimulate the immune system, regulate blood sugar levels, and lower cholesterol. Farro also contains more protein than most whole grains, and it’s packed with B vitamins, antioxidants, and essential minerals such as manganese and zinc. While farro is low in gluten, it is not gluten-free.

Farro comes in multiple varieties: whole/unpearled, semi-pearled (semi-perlato), or pearled (perlato). These distinctions refer to how much exterior bran and germ have been removed from the grain. More Some farro labeled “whole” is actually semi-pearled. To distinguish types of farro, look at the cooking time on the package. If it says 15 minutes or less, it’s pearled. 30 minutes? Semi-pearled. 50 minutes or longer means it’s whole.

For this risotto recipe, Serena recommends semi-pearled farro However, all three types will work fine.

5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided

12 Brussels sprouts, washed and quartered

1 pinch salt

½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

1 large shallot, minced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1¼ cups semi-pearled farro (or arborio rice of you’re gluten-intolerant)

½ cup dry white wine

4½ cups low-sodium chicken stock (or make your own chicken stock by boiling chicken bones and skimming off extra fat)

3 ounces prosciutto, diced

1 teaspoon fresh lemon zest, plus extra for garnish

¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese, plus extra for garnish

Start with the Brussels sprouts. Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large skillet. When hot add the Brussels sprouts.

Add the crushed red pepper flakes and a pinch of salt to the sprouts and cook, stirring periodically, for about 15 minutes until lightly browned and tender. Set aside while you cook the farro. (To save time, you can also cook your Brussels sprouts at the same time as the farro). Pour the chicken stock into a medium saucepan and bring to a simmer, lower the heat and keep warm.

Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large Dutch oven or saucepan. Add the shallots and sauté for about 3 minutes until they become translucent. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute until fragrant.

Stir in the farro, so that it’s well coated in the olive oil and toast for 3 minutes. Be careful not to let the shallots or grains burn.

Reduce the heat to low and add the white wine. Cook, making sure to scrape any brown bits from the bottom of the pan, until the liquid is completely absorbed.

Once the wine is absorbed, pour 1 cup of the warm stock to the pan, so that the farro is just covered with liquid.

Reduce the heat to low and add the white wine. Cook, making sure to scrape any brown bits from the bottom of the pan, until the liquid is completely absorbed.

Once the wine is absorbed, pour 1 cup of the warm stock to the pan, so that the farro is just covered with liquid.

After the last addition of stock has been mostly absorbed, stir in the Brussels sprouts and 2 ounces of the diced prosciutto and stir until the farro is creamy and the sprouts are heated through.

Remove from heat and stir in the final tablespoon of olive oil, Parmesan and lemon zest. Taste and season with fresh ground pepper if you like.

Garnish with the remaining prosciutto, extra Parmesan and a sprinkle of lemon zest and serve immediately

 



Bobbie Hasselbring, RFT Editor

RFT co-founder Bobbie Hasselbring has been a travel junkie her entire life. An award-winning writer and editor for more than 25 years and author of the regional food-travel bestsellers, The Chocolate Lover’s Guide to the Pacific Northwest and The Chocolate Lover’s Guide Cookbook, Bobbie is editor-in-chief at realfoodtraveler.com.